Administrative Detention

The practice employed by the Israeli military of detaining people indefinitely based on an administrative order, without charges brought against them and without standing trial. Administrative detention is predominantly used against Palestinians from the Occupied Territories. Israel has placed thousands of Palestinians under administrative detention over the years, many for prolonged periods of time. During the First Intifada, Israel held its highest number of Palestinians in administrative detention; nearly 1,800. The numbers of administrative detainees shrank dramatically during the 90’s (there were 12 administrative detainees in December 2000), but rose again sharply to over 1,000 during the April 2002 Israeli Military Invasion. As of July 2014, 446 Palestinians were being held by Israel in administrative detention. Israeli citizens (including settlers) can also be held in administrative detention, but this occurs rarely and the detentions are short in duration. Though some forms of administrative detention are permitted under international law, under very strict circumstances, human rights groups have decried Israel’s widespread use of administrative detention as a violation of human rights and of the protections of due process enshrined in both Israeli and international law. See “Administrative Detention,” Addameer; and “Israel: The injustice and secrecy surrounding administrative detention,” Amnesty International, June 6, 2012. See also infographic "A Guide To Administrative Detention," Visualizing Palestine.

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